American Alpine Jounrna and Accidents in North American Climbing

Antarctica, South Georgia, Mt. Paget and Other Attempts

  • Climbs And Expeditions
  • Climb Year:
  • Publication Year: 2005

Mt. Paget and other attempts. From February to May 2005 a multi-national team of climbers sailed the yacht Gambo from Ushuaia in Argentina to King Edward Point in South Georgia, and then back to Pireapolis in Uruguay. The team, which included Tom Chamberlain (UK), David Fasel (Switzerland), Daniel Haywood (UK), Tim Hall (UK), the yacht skipper Alun Hubbard (UK), and additional (non-climbing) crew members Alastair Gunn (UK) and Rory Williams (US) attempted various ascents on this highly glaciated sub-Antarctic island. Not atypical South Georgia weather thwarted any major achievements, though there were some near misses. While based between Husvik and Grytviken the climbers made three attempts on the unclimbed Quad 5 and Mt. Paulsen, and the once-previously climbed Mt. Spaaman (1,940m). All failed due to either weather or poor rock. On the way to Spaaman one party managed to make an ascent of the previously climbed Admiralty Peak. A total of 14 days were spent attempting a previous Hubbard nemesis, the unclimbed east ridge of Paget, the highest peak on the island and also the highest on British soil. One of these nearly made the top. However, they did make the first ascent of a 7,000' subsidiary summit of Paget, which has been named Buzen Point. Shortly after getting down from one attempt on Paget, the climbers experienced a classic South Georgia blow, caused by the rapid onset of a 929mb low pressure at sea level. Things got a trifle breezy and the roof was blown off the British Antarctic Survey hut at King Edward Point, one of the more sheltered locations on the island.

Alun Hubbard, Wales

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