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South America, Peru–Cordillera Huayhuash, Rosario Norte, Sarapo Oeste, Ancocancha Este and Other Peaks

Rosario Norte, Sarapo Oeste, Ancocancha Este and Other Peaks. On July 20 Peter Leeming, Cedric Marsh, William Patterson and I packed our gear onto four burros and set off on our two-day walk from Cajatambo to Base Camp at 4300 meters on the southwest comer of Laguna Jurau. Our first objective was Rosario Norte. We walked slowly up the Ruri Lelle and bivouacked at 5000 meters. The north ridge proved to be composed of extremely shattered rock and we turned back. The next day, July 25, Marsh and I left for the east ridge, a relatively straightforward snow climb except for a problematic rock step. We reached the summit of Rosario Norte (5596 meters, 18,350 feet) at 12:15 P.M. Patterson and Leeming went up the Jurau Glacier to investigate a possible ascent of Trapecio while Marsh and I planned a visit to the Ancocancha region on the west side of the Quebrada Seria. We two climbed to the foot of the long east ridge of Ancocancha Este. On the third day we got high but not to the summit. On our return to Base Camp we found that Patterson and Leeming had found the snow too deep on the west-southwest buttress of Trapecio but on July 28 had climbed P 5297 (17,379 feet) between Trapecio and Quesillo via some old fixed ropes on the west face. We then all headed for Sarapo Oeste (5567 meters, 18,266 feet), an apparently unclimbed satellite of Sarapo. We bivouacked at Sarapoqocha, below our peak’s west ridge. On August 2 we four traversed around the west ridge and climbed by two different routes on the steep ice of the north face. Marsh and I opted for a new route up P 5297. We climbed a steep iced gully with little protection. This brought us to below a huge umbrellashaped cornice. A long traverse right found us a break in the cornice and we got to the Trapecio-P 5297 col. Half an hour of scrambling brought us to the summit. Marsh and I then hoped to climb Ancocancha Este. From a bivouac at the foot of the east ridge, we reached our previous high point. We floundered through powder snow to reach a point above a large col below the summit. Beyond the col, the snow was avalanche-prone. A windslab parted from the line of our footprints. We reached the narrow domed summit (5600 meters, 18,373 feet) at 11:50 A.M. on August 8. This may have been a first ascent. The last climb, which all of us made, was of Rasac (6040) meters, 19,817 feet) by its east ridge on August 13.I made a small 20-minute diversion to climb to the top of Seria Norte (5860 meters, 19,226 feet) on the descent.

Mark Lowe, North London Mountaineering Club, England