American Alpine Jounrna and Accidents in North American Mountaineering
Publication
AAJ
Section
Climbs And Expeditions
Volume
25
Issue
57
Copyright Date
1983
Page
148

North America, United States, Alaska, "Mount Titanic," Revelation Mountains

Climbs And Expeditions

“Mount Titanic,” Revelation Mountains. In late May and early June 1981 we visited a group of unnamed and previously unvisited peaks in the northern portion of the remote Revelation Mountains. Doug McCarty, Craig Tillery, Dan Hogan and I landed on a gravel bar alongside an upper fork of the Big River. After a trip to Mount Hesperus, where we found snow and rock stability conditions intolerable, we set as our goal the bulky rock and ice peak at the head of a glacier several miles to the east (9300 + feet). Interesting canyon and alp slope traverses led to the glacier, where we placed a camp near the edge. Facing us was a major granitic rock wall, a climbing opportunity we did not have time to undertake. The best route to reach the summit was to continue along the glacier, outflanking the peak on the south, then to climb an ice rampart beneath cliffs of the east face. There were a few steep sections and crevasse problems, but otherwise the route led to the broad summit dome without difficulty. Clouds and a few snow flurries blocked distant views, but the cool temperatures made for good climbing conditions. Poor weather prevented serious attempts on attractive neighboring peaks. We left the area by aircraft pickup on the gravel bar.

Fred Beckey

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