American Alpine Jounrna and Accidents in North American Climbing

South America, Southern Peru, Map of Part of the Cordillera Carabaya from the Survey of the New Zealand Andean Expedition, 1967

  • Notes
  • Climb Year:
  • Publication Year: 1972

Map of Part of the Cordillera Carabaya from the Survey of the New Zealand Andean Expedition, 1967. We used a Kern DKM1 Theodolite. The heights and location of the main peaks within the range were determined by theodolite triangulation (approximately fourth order) which was connected to a Bench Mark in the main square of Macusani. A half mile long control base line was initially established in a North-South direction, a short distance above Base Camp in the Taype Valley. This base line was then extended by means of theodolite triangulation (braced quadralateral) to an East-West control base of approximately one mile in length and in turn through a further braced quadralateral to an extended control line between Destornillador (Screwdriver) and Nevada Zavala (C2). The latter extended base provided the primary control for the bulk of the mapping-work carried out. Azimuth control was obtained from a series of ex-meridian sun observations along the second base extension. The theodolite (weight approximately 7 lbs) was carried up Nevada Zavala (16,645 feet, Destornillador (18,184 feet) Ollachea Ritti (C3) (17,164 feet), Kimsa Quiro (17,989 feet), To-coccapac (18,435 feet), and Allinccapac (18,859 feet), and observations taken to all major observable summits together with a full panorama of photographs. The initial 25-mile triangulation closure connecting Macusani to the main network showed a vertical misclose of 3 feet. The heights of the peaks observed are all accurate to within ±3 feet of relative height.

A. G. PARTON, New Zealand Alpine Club

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