American Alpine Jounrna and Accidents in North American Climbing

North America, United States, Wyoming, Southern Wind River Range, First Ascents and New Routes

  • Climbs And Expeditions
  • Climb Year:
  • Publication Year: 1962

First Ascents and New Routes, Southern Wind River Range. We are uncertain how much of our route on Mount Temple’s north face, which we did on August 22, is new, but we believe that the upper half, above the glacier, is a complete deviation from a climb done in 1946. Because Bruce Monroe and I lacked ice equipment, we kept to the rock margin on the right of a small glacier and encountered friable rock. Climbing was mostly fourth class with one sixth-class and one difficult fifth-class pitch. Time from Deep Lake to the summit was 6½ hours. The next day Yvon Chouinard, Art Gran and John Hudson made the first ascent of Steeple. This pyramid-shaped summit was climbed from Deep Lake via the south ridge. About 100 feet below the summit the route follows a crack system on a vertical block, remaining on the left extremity of the ridge. Also on August 23 Hudson and Monroe made the first ascent of Haystack, a summit on the ridge north of Steeple, by slabs on the west face to the ridge south of the summit, the climbing being third and fourth class. They then followed the ridge to the summit, partly roped and on the last section on boulders. The overhanging, studded south face of Bollinger Peak has only one reasonable route line, that being the deep chimney cleaving the face directly beneath the summit. On August 30, Hudson and I approached from Lonesome Lake. Once on the cirque headwall we climbed perhaps 500 feet of the chimney unroped, which was possible because of the excellent crystalline granite. Then the chimney veers up to an overhang, which we climbed by stemming, using three pitons. The next lead was the most difficult, with a final ten-foot move wedging hands and kletterschuhe in cracks running through a decided overhang; fortunately piton protection was fairly good. Two fourth-class pitches brought us to the summit, just at the onset of a hailstorm.

Fred Beckey

This AAJ article has been reformatted into HTML. Please contact us if you spot an error.